Post-War Fords

June 26, 2020UncategorizedEZ-ResultsEdit

Source: Ford

Post-War Fords

Generally, Fords built in Canada mirrored their American counterparts. At times, a body type may have been omitted from Canadian production, but still offered in limited numbers as an import.

However, there was one was one leading deviation by post-war Canadian Fords from the U.S. pattern. That concerned all the 1954 Fords. It was for that year the U.S. discarded the old flat-head V-8 to introduce the new more powerful ohv V-8.

Ford Motor Company of Canada did not offer the new engine until the 1955 models. So, the 1954 Canadian-built Fords retained the old flat-head V-8. For 1952 and 1953, all Ford used the 239 cid 110 hp engine.

However, the 1954 Customline and Crestline series got the larger 255 cid version, rated at 120 hp. That was the engine the two upper lines of Meteor had used.

When the new V-8 came to Canadian Fords, it was the 272 cid engine rated at 162 hp. No power-pack or other engine options were available.

Finally, after a 15-year delay, the six-cylinder motor was available as a delete option in the early spring of 1956.

In any 1957 Fords which did not have the six, the new V-8 appeared. It displaced 272 cubic inches like the American-made Fords. However, the power rating was only a 190 hp in Canada, but 205 in the U.S.

In subsequent years, engines in Canadian Fords were similar to American models. Some power ratings may have differed, and some optional engines may not have been obtainable in Canada.

After, the Canada-U.S. Auto Pact came into effect in 1965, a greater quantity of the models not made in Canada were imported duty-free from the States. The Mustang and Thunderbird are two examples.

On very rare occasions, dealers would concoct a variation from the normal production model. In 1968 and 1969, at least one Ford dealer sold a special Custom two-door sedan model. It featured a vinyl-covered roof, and the LTD front end with hidden headlights. This was an unusual combination of prestige in the very bottom end of the full-size Ford range.

Mercury 114

Mercury 114

In 1939, the 703 Ford dealers across Canada sold both Fords and Mercurys. A few dealers sold Lincolns. After World War II, Ford Motor Company of Canada split their dealer network into two divisions. Existing dealers sold Ford, the new Monarch, and Ford trucks.

A new branch of dealers sold Mercurys, imported Lincolns, and a new line of Mercury trucks. By 1947, Ford Motor Company of Canada had 1,113 dealers, 353 of which were Mercury-Lincoln outlets.

Because Ford was in the low-priced field, it was more popular in Canada than the medium-priced Mercury. So that the new Mercury dealers could get a piece of the low-priced action, a smaller lower-cost Mercury line emerged.

Meteor phase 1

Meteor (Phase 1)

All Ford products shed their old prewar styling for a postwar new look. Of course, Ford of Canada’s unique models also embraced the new styling.

A June 25, 1948 press release stated, “The Mercury and Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited announced today that it would shortly introduce a brand new automobile in the low-priced field, to be known as the ‘Meteor.’ It will be exclusive to the Canadian market and will be distributed by the Mercury and Lincoln dealers across the Dominion.”

Monarch

Monarch

When the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited developed the Mercury 114, Mercury dealers had an advantage over Ford dealers. They could sell cars in both low- and mid-priced fields. So that the Canadian Ford dealers could compete on a level playing field, Ford of Canada established a new make in the Mercury 118 class. Based on Mercury, it was called Monarch, and made its debut in 1946.

It used a chromed Mercury grille frame, and replaced Mercury’s many thin vertical bars with three horizontal bars. Below the main grille, Mercury had two long oval openings. Monarch had these also, but placed just one bar across each instead of two as Mercury had.

Edsel

Edsel

Few cars have ever been introduced with as much hype and excitement as the Edsel. It brought in huge crowds to kick its tires, but failed to find many buyers.

Ford Motor Company of Canada made a wise decision by having existing Ford dealers handle the Edsel. In hindsight, it was much better than setting up an entirely new dealer network as was done stateside.

Frontenac

Frontenac

Frontenac was a Governor of New France in the latter 17th century. His name was used on a Canadian car built by Durant in 1931. When Ford Motor Company of Canada introduced a compact car for 1960, it seemed strange that they chose a name used by another company. But after 29 years, only the oldest of car trivia fanatics would remember.

The Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited was keeping quite a level playing field for its two dealer chains. For just about every model the Ford branch sold, the Mercury-Meteor branch had a comparable model to sell.

Meteor phase 2

Meteor (Phase 2)

The sudden and late decision by the U.S. to stop making the Mercury Meteor left Ford Motor Company of Canada in a dilemma. Some quotes from the PRODUCT IMAGE AND STRATEGY document from Ford of Canada’s Product Planning Office sheds some light on how the Canadian company responded to this predicament.

“The Meteor’s principal competition is the Pontiac, the industry leader. . . .The Canadian Pontiac has the U.S. Pontiac Catalina body shell with a Chevrolet chassis and driveline including 230 CID six cylinder engine.” 

More Unique Mercurys

More Unique Mercurys

The Ford-based Meteor was heralded by the Mercury 114. Likewise, a low cost Mercury model preceded the Mercury-based Meteor. For 1963, Ford Motor Company of Canada made available the Mercury 400.

This Canadian-only, entry-level, full-size Mercury looked like a stripped Monterey. There were no Monterey nameplates on the car, nor was there any 400 ID’s.

Ford Canada: A Heritage as Rich as the Land Itself

Enjoy 100+ years of sometimes exclusive, always exciting cars & trucks built by Ford of Canada

Pre-War Fords

Canada’s climate is colder, its population is smaller, and its economy is different compared with the United States. These and other factors have set the stage for some fascinating differences in Canadian cars over the last century. Even cars produced by the same manufacturer often digressed from the American pattern. What follows is a review of the uniqueness found in many vehicles produced by the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited during its long and illustrious history.

The first car built by the Ford Motor Company of Canada in early 1904 was the Model C. A total of 117 cars were made in the first year. Most were 2-cylinder Model C’s but a few 4-cylinder Model B’s were also built. Both were made in 1905 along with the Model F, a new 2-cylinder car.

In 1906, the Model C and Model B were discontinued, but two new models came on the scene. The Model N was a low-priced 4-cylinder car, but the 406 cid 6-cylinder Model K was huge and expensive.

The Model F was gone by 1907, but there were two new Fords – Model R and Model S. Both were 4-cylinder cars, and built along with the Model N and Model K through much of 1908.

Production of all those models ceased when the Model T made its debut in October 1908. The Canadian-made Fords were similar to the American models, although there may have been minor departures due to the use of Canadian components. Ford Motor Company of Canada constantly tried to keep a high level of Canadian content.

During the Model T era, Ford Motor Company of Canada chose not to produce some body types. For instance, sometimes there were no Canadian 2- door Model T sedans. Four-door Model T sedans were made in Canada before they were in the U.S. Four doors were convenient for people going from province to province where right and left drive laws varied.

Some body types were sold under different names. When the American T Runabout was called a Roadster in 1923, Ford Motor Company of Canada continued calling it a Runabout.

It was also in 1923, when Ford called the 2-door sedan a Tudor. Ford Motor Company of Canada adopted the same name for it, and even went further and called the 4-door sedan a Fordor. Ford used that term for many years, but it originated in Canada and used for five years before it was in the States.

The arrival of the Model A brought a much greater variety of body types, though Ford Motor Company of Canada never produced quite all the body styles made south of the border. Model A station wagons, for instance, were never made in Canada.

Ford’s famous V-8 was introduced in mid 1932, simultaneously in both countries. Ford of Canada dropped 4-cylinder cars in 1933, while they were on the market a year longer in the U.S.

The northern firm produced some body types not made in the States. From 1929 through 1936, Rumble Seat models were available in more varieties for Canadians than Americans.

Also for 1936, all Canadian-built Tudors had trunks, while this was not always true in the States. In addition, Canadians were treated to the Special DeLuxe, a top-line series of 10 models above the DeLuxe.

The little 134 cid 60 hp V-8 appeared in both countries in 1937. It was an economical alternative to the regular V-8. But, Ford Motor Company of Canada stopped offering it in the 1939 lineup. It continued to be available in the U.S. until the 1941 models arrived.

Ford’s first 6-cylinder car since the Model K made its debut in the 1941 models. Buyers could choose it or the V-8, but only in the States. Not until many years later did Ford Motor Company of Canada offer a 6-cylinder engine.

The 1941 Fords in both countries came in three series: Special, DeLuxe and Super DeLuxe. There were only two series for 1942, but not the same two in both countries. Ford of Canada kept the entry-level Special and deleted the Super DeLuxe. In contrast, Ford in the States deleted the Special and kept the top-line Super DeLuxe.

Check back in for the next phase of Ford Trucks!